Advanced Materials for Energy

03 March
Wednesday 8:30-10:30 GMT, 17:30-19:30 JST
Advanced Materials for Energy

Jointly organized by Cavendish Laboratory, University of Cambridge Research Center for Advanced Science and Technology (RCAST), the University of Tokyo
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Moderator

Yoshitaka Okada
Professor of Department of New Energy at the Research Center for Advanced Science and Technology (RCAST)
The University of Tokyo
Biography:
Prof. Yoshitaka Okada is a Professor at the Research Center for Advanced Science and Technology (RCAST), and also the Head of the Academic-Industrial Joint Laboratory for Renewable Energy of RCAST of the University of Tokyo. He received his BSc (1st class Honours) in electronic and electrical engineering from King’s College, the University of London in 1984, and MEng and Ph.D. degrees in electronic engineering from the University of Tokyo in 1987 and 1990. He was appointed as Visiting Assistant Professor in the Department of Electrical Engineering, Stanford University in 1995-96, Visiting Fellow in the Department of Physics, Imperial College London in 2006, and Visiting Fellow of Clare Hall and Cavendish Laboratory of the University of Cambridge in 2015.

Research Interests: 
His recent research interests include thin-film growth of low-dimensional III-V quantum nanostructures for applications to advanced high-efficiency photovoltaics such as multijunction and intermediate-band solar cells.

David Ritchie
Professor of Experimental Physics, and Head of Semiconductor Physics at the Cavendish Laboratory, University of Cambridge. Professor of Semiconductor Science and Technology, Swansea University
Biography:
Prof. Ritchie received his first degree, in physics, from the University of Oxford in 1980 and his D Phil from the University of Sussex in 1986 studying the physics of mixtures of liquid 3He and 4He at millikelvin temperatures. Since then, he has been working on semiconductor physics and has extensive experience of the growth, fabrication, and measurement of low dimensional electronic and optical structures. He has been co-author of over 1200 papers and 500 conference presentations and was awarded the 2008 Tabor medal and prize by the UK Institute of Physics for distinguished research in surface or nanoscale physics. He is a Fellow of the UK Institute of Physics and in 2020 was elected a Fellow of the Learned Society of Wales.

Research Interests: 
His recent research interests concern the MBE growth and fabrication of low-dimensional structures and devices. These include high mobility electron and hole gases for studies of quantum transport in 2D, 1D, and 0D; the development of single and entangled photon sources for applications to quantum communications; and the development of quantum cascade lasers and detectors for applications in the THz region of the spectrum.

Speakers

Satoshi Iwamoto
Professor, Research Center for Advanced Science and Technology (RCAST) and Institute of Industrial Science (IIS), The University of Tokyo
Biography:
Prof. Satoshi Iwamoto received the B.S., M.S., and Ph.D. degrees in the applied physics from the University of Tokyo, Tokyo, Japan, in 1997, 1999, and 2002, respectively. During 2001–2002, he was a Research Fellow of the Japan Society for the Promotion of Science. In 2002, he joined the University of Tokyo, as a Research Associate. He is currently Professor at the Research Center for Advanced Science and Technology (RCAST) and at the Institute of Industrial Science, the University of Tokyo. He has been serving as a Specially Appointed Fellow in Center for Research and Development Strategy (CRDS), Japan Science and Technology Agency (JST) since 2018. He was elected to Fellow of the OSA (The Optical Society) in 2021.

Research Interests: 
His recent research interests include photonic nanostructures, topological photonics and phononics, quantum nanophotonics, solid-state cavity quantum electrodynamics.

Siân Dutton
Reader in Physics and Solid State Chemistry, Cavendish Laboratory
University of Cambridge
Biography:
Dr. Siân Dutton is a Reader in Physics and Solid State Chemistry at the Cavendish Laboratory, University of Cambridge. Her research is focused on exploring the properties of complex oxides for energy applications including batteries and solid state magnetic cooling. Prior to taking up the fellowship in 2012, Siân was a postdoctoral research associate in the group of Prof. Bob Cava in Princeton University where she worked on geometrically frustrated magnetic systems.

Research Interests: 
Her research is on the use of complex oxides in energy applications including batteries, solid state magnetic cooling and photovoltaics. Her work focuses on using chemical manipulation to alter the crystal and electronic structure with the aim of controlling the physical properties. Current projects include investigating low temperature metastable materials for use in batteries, exploring the viability of Mg-ion batteries and understanding the role of structure and spin dimensionality in lanthanide oxides and how this impacts their use for magnetic cooling.

Yujin Zhang
Assistant professor of Department of Fundamental Engineering, Institute of
Industrial Science (IIS)
The University of Tokyo
Biography:
Dr. Yijin Zhang received MEng and PhD degrees from the University of Tokyo in 2013 and 2016 studying the electrical and optical properties of two-dimensional transition metal dichalcogenides (TMDs). He was appointed as JSPS researcher in the Institute of Scientific and Industrial Research, Osaka University and Visiting scientist in Max Planck Institute for Solid State Research (MPI) since 2016, Scientist MPI in 2019, and Assistant Professor in the Institute of Industrial Science, the University of Tokyo in 2019.

Research Interests: 
His research interests cover a wide range of opto-electrical properties of functionalities of two-dimensional materials. In particular he targets on the phenomena emerging from crystal structure and symmetry unique to the material. These include chiral light emission; exciton Hall effect; bulk photovoltaic effect, based on which he seeks for practical device applications such as LEDs, photo detectors, and solar cells.

Chiara Ciccarelli
Harding University Lecturer, Cavendish Laboratory
University of Cambridge
Biography:
Dr. Chiara Ciccarelli completed her undergraduate and master studies at Tor Vergata University in Rome in 2008. She received her PhD from Cambridge in 2012 and from 2012 to 2016 she held a Junior Research Fellowship at Gonville and Caius College. In November 2016 she started her research group at the Cavendish Laboratory with a Winton Advanced Research Fellowship, in October 2017 she became Royal Society University Research Fellow. Since October 2019 she is a Harding Lecturer.

Research Interests: 
Her research focusses on the study of spin-charge conversion effects in inversion-asymmetric magnetic structures and at superconductor-ferromagnet interfaces. More recently she moved part of her research to ultra-fast spintronics by building a time-resolved optical pump-THz emission set-up in Cambridge, particularly picosecond spin emission from different types of magnetic orders.

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